• Warm up with Hot Stone Massage

    by Dr. Lori Nuzzi
    on Jun 27th, 2017

Winter in your bones? Then how about a therapeutic HOT STONE massage? Hot Stones have been used as a compliment to massage therapy for hundreds of years. The history of the stones dates way back to Egyptian times. The stones were used regularly for their healing properties by Native Americans, as well as Chinese and Indian Cultures.

The heat from the stones is released deep into the muscles and offers a very sedative effect that definitely adds a lot of "aahhh" to a regular massage. The stones used are made of basalt, which is rich in iron and retains heat. The stones are very smooth to the touch and usually have come from moving river waters.

Before the Hot Stone session, the stones are immersed in water and heated until they reach 120 - 130 degrees. Sometimes the stones are placed gently on the body and left there. Another technique is that the stone is used as an extension of the therapists hands. It is also common to have a combination of those two techniques.

The therapist will introduce the hot stone to the skin, check in with you regarding temperature, and then begin to manipulate the muscle using the stone. At this point the therapist will become one with the stone and the heat will deeply relax the muscles and soft tissues.

Some of the benefits of the hot stone massage are:

The stones are great for deep tissue work because the heat assists to release the muscle and myofascial restrictions more efficiently.

Don't like deep work? That's okay because the heat penetrates into the layers leaving the therapist to glide without the need for excessive pressure. Whatever pressure you like, a hot stone session will meet all of your expectations. Tension and stress melt away by combining heat with massage and offer a truly soothing experience for mind, body and spirit.

Author Dr. Lori Nuzzi

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